Enter the Spectacular House of Artist Bjørn Wiinblad

Black and white  art  work
Who lived here: Danish artist Bjørn Wiinblad (1918-2006). The Blue House is owned by the Bjørn Wiinblad Fund. Wiinblad’s in long run chauffeur and right-hand man, René Schultz, is in charge of its day-to-day care, as well as for led visits.

Location: Kongens Lyngby, about 9 miles north of Copenhagen, Denmark
Size: About 7, 500 sq . feet (700 square meters) over two floors, with a drafting room, course and private residence
Visit the Blue House: The shop and workshop are open to visitors Tuesdays from 10 a. mirielle. to midnight, March one to Oct. 31. Guided tours of the sleep of the house are around for groups of 16 or more and must be booked ahead of  time.

 

His style is about as significantly from typical Scandinavian minimalism as can be: vibrant and adventurous, packed with detail and elaborate artwork. Some might say it’s “too much. ” The particular same words could be used to
describe the Azure House in Kongens Lyngby, outside Copenhagen, which Wiinblad bought in the early 1960s and set up to be both his workshop and home. He lived there until his death in 2006.

Houzz visited the home, which has been conserved just as the artist remaining it and is open up to the public for guided tours thanks to the sponsorship of the Danish Rosendahl Design Team (not to be baffled with Rosenthal, the The
german language

porcelain company for which Wiinblad developed a lot of his designs).
It was only at that drawing board — which boasts a view of the garden’s magnolia shrub — that Wiinblad created a large number of his singular items, many methods from figures and ceramic plaques to theater sets and costumes to  Oriental-style

 

tapestries and hotel decoration. He was a legendary artist whose diverse works ranged from incredibly expensive and unique projects to mass-produced ashtrays.

 

The Blue House was definately not a quiet artist’s oasis during Wiinblad’s time, based on chauffeur and aide René Schultz, who started working for him in 1978.
All of us were all often invited to dinner in the evening, ” Schultz states. “Then his housekeeper, Ms. Jørgensen, would cook some wonderful food, which was a clever way of making us stay and work longer. After dinner, we would go back to work

 

and stay until 11: 00 or eleven: 30 in the evening, simply because it was cozy and nice to be there. ”

Wiinblad was fully active in the creative process and managed the decision-making, Schulz says. He oversaw whatever was happening in the drafting and painting rooms, here with two other Black and white  art  work he previously in Denmark. Wiinblad
ceramics

are still painted and manufactured in the Blue House, though not at the rate seen during the height of his career in the ’60s and ’70s.